1. To work remotely you need to discipline yourself. However, if you master it, the life changes. You can enjoy the beaches of Valencia, fashion cafes of Milan and port of Lisbon while working.

  2. I‘m afraid of people since I started working remotely. Not because I‘m used to be alone, but because I appreciate it even more.

  3. When a call goes on for longer than you anticipate and your dog is anxious to go for a walk. And just then the bell rings. What do you do?

  4. This could be the most Millenial website ever. Here's my contribution: "I'm working from home today, and my kids are sick. They scream all the time and every twenty minutes or so I have to turn on a different cartoon for them or dose them up on some kind of drug. Come to think of it, it's not so very different from a normal day in the office."

  5. You dont have a "real" remote job unless it's 99% remote. None of this 3 days remote, 2 days on site bullshit.

  6. We are the remote workers. The remote work is a big power, but with great power comes great responsibility. Let's keep on demonstrating the world that this is the right path for a better and more effective society. Let's not become a bunch of lazy assholes.

  7. Who works at a startup and constantly have pointless Zoom calls/meetings? A quick email will suffice, just saying...

  8. Being sick while working remotely is the worst. It’s hard for me to draw a line between work and rest. I want to work but I need to rest... but my laptop is so close and I just need to do one thing... I need help, please give me your tips

  9. Pro of remote work loneliness is that I am much more creative. Being alone helps me have ideas and really develop them in my mind. In an office, this process would be interrupted by many other things. This is an interesting counterpart.

  10. I just work with my cat on the desk.

  11. The crazy thing about my job is I can go weeks without talking to anyone at the office. I think most of them don't know I exist. I just get my work done (social media) and send them invoices. Once in a blue moon someone will give me something to post, but mostly I make my own decisions and I get almost no feedback. Sometimes I recognize the name of someone from the office liking something I post. That's the extent of the feedback I get from them. But they keep paying my invoices so I assume they must be satisfied with my work. Or they just don't care and are happy not to think about it. Either way, it's fine with me.

  12. Working remotely means I can drive my grandpa to the doctor in the morning and catch up with work whenever I can.

  13. I have been operating 3 companies remotely since last 2 years. One is 3 year old in fact, I now operate team of about 28 people, all working remotely and we have never ever faced any issue with remote working lifestyle. Everything is super great and I believe its all about the execution.

  14. I use my non-billed time in the day to daydream about making a self sustainable SaaS product and never having to work again ❤️

  15. A cup of tea, baby's cradle and winters in your garden, the perfect office setup. Can't ask for more in life!

  16. I love changing coffee shops where I work. God bless you laptopfriendly.co

  17. I got an offer from a Singapore based startup finesse digital but they cancelled the offer recently before i joined. I have already resigned from my existing employer. Talk about ethical work environment?

  18. Nothing like hitting snooze until 5 minutes before a conference call, rolling out of bed, sitting down at my desk, and starting work for the day. No thirty minute drives into work, no hunting for parking spaces. And after the call, I can go back to bed if I want. For a little while anyway.

  19. Lots of high-profile companies reached out for interviews, but once I told them I am only looking for full-time remote positions, they all silently disappeared. It's really really hard to get a full time remote job even if you have a competitive resume and career. People don't appreciate your time and effort because you are just another tiny voice on the internet, and they can easily turn you off.

  20. When I first started working remotely, I desperately wanted to be "part of the team" and wasted a lot of energy asking lots of questions and trying to form relationships with my "coworkers" on slack. But then I realized that we're all happier if I just quietly get my shit done without bothering anyone. 9 out of 10 times I can figure out how to handle a situation on my own and I like the autonomy. I just pretend I'm working for myself.

  21. Is there an API or RSS feed for this? I need to see these posts ASAP. Love this site.

  22. Started freelancing February 2015 after reading "Remote: Office not Required". Got huge raise from $4/h to $8/h, then $12, now $25. It's almost impossible to find this kind of job in Russia so I'm glad I was able to overcome my fears and leave office job to do it full-time. Still, I'm not satisfied and want to start my own business where I could share my experience with others, help other people, consult them on a web development, and probably become financially independent. There are couple downsides as well, but I've managed to overcome them. First, I've got really beautiful in all aspects SO. She helped me to let go my fears and greatly raised my confidence. I was able to tell my partner (boss) that $12/h isn't going to work anymore because I'm no longer alone and he easily raised it to $16, then $25 after we've got a new client. Another thing is that I can wake up pretty much anytime. There is no such thing as a "morning" for me now. One day I've woke up at 1 am and the other day it was 5 pm. It kind of sucks though when I need to order something and delivery man says he could appear anywhere from 10 am to 8 pm. Probably one of the best parts of living a nightlife is that you can go into the 24-hour store and see not a single person at the checkout. I think queues in stores would be in the past pretty soon (3-5 years) with Amazon Go introduced not long ago. I'm glad I was born in such revolutionary time. Everything changes in a way you don't expect and sometimes it would really inspire you. It's kind of crazy to think that we are sitting at home all day long and I've gained some fat because of that (not a big deal for me, though). I just don't want to leave her even for 5 minutes to go outside and simply walk around and exercise. She cannot walk outside too much because of some strange illness — when doing exercises, worrying, or simply walking to the store and back could cause dizziness, headache, and even vomiting. Every walk for her is a pain and stress. Doctors couldn't get a diagnose for it. Poor girl. Hopefully, full paid medical examination would help to shed some light on this issue, because I really want to take her on a walk into parks. We are living in a green town with many places to go, but sure there are a lot of people living out there, it's 30km near Moscow. At the moment I'm learning data structures, algorithms, Ruby, and want to join some good team where I can make a difference. As a developer, I don't see myself simply coding requirements for clients but actually discussing if that feature is needed right now or there is a better alternative for what they want. When the boss asks me to estimate time for the feature, I'm always looking for existing solutions and taking maintainability into account. Recently I've even had an opportunity to contribute to an open source package we are using now in the project! That was pretty cool experience — figuring out your requirements and generalizing them to a broader audience. Not to mention seeing "first pull request" and "first issue" in your Github profile. Every project I've done so far is not just an opportunity to earn money. It takes some time to learn about the domain and see how can you improve it. How much money would you lose if you hire someone without attitude to work on the project? I was working on that kind of project where codebase was spoiled by cheap developer force. Technical debt was reeeealy huuuuge. I didn't know what to do. It took me literally a year to remove about 40% of that debt. How many new features were developed? Not many. For every new feature, I had to fix about 30-50 old bugs. And all of that without unit testing. Imagine that. Every day I'm reading something new about web development, exploring new stuff. I've gathered so much knowledge and started to think that I need some kind of blog where I could share all my knowledge and experience. But I like to generalize and my initial requirements grew up into something more than a simple personal blog. Basically, everyone could create multiple blogs, write posts, see comments. And one of the features was anonymous blogging. Yeah just like this site, but everyone could create their own personal storyboard. But I still don't know how to make it completely anonymous so even website hoster couldn't know who made a post on an anonymous blog, but users could manage (create, update posts, etc) their anonymous blogs just like ordinary ones. That's it for now. Thank you for reading.

  23. My cranky non-remote worker was impatiently waiting for me to be on conference call for an hour, while I was struggling to extinguish the fire on top of my house.

  24. Coffee shops were amazing at first, but then i realised i couldn't go to the toilet without taking all my stuff with me :) Annoying when you got into a good rhythm.

  25. Everytime my cofounder and I talk on Skype, I do my nails. He can't see.